My 2015 review

Just wanted to finish 2015 with a huge THANK YOU to everyone who has read, followed or commented on my blog this year.  I’ve ‘met’ so many wonderful people through blogging.

To bring regular readers up to date with a couple of the stories that have been flowing through my blog in the last few months…

My friend William received his first royalty payment from sales of his book The Words of William: Volume One.  He insists the money doesn’t bother him, but the number of people all over the world who have read it and commented on it makes him feel great.  We’re hoping for a few more sales in the New Year and maybe some star ratings and reviews on Amazon by those who have enjoyed it.

Last week little Tuesday, my erstwhile student turned ballet star, visited the Royal Opera House in London and met Sarah Lamb – her favourite principal ballerina.  Tragically, on the same day her lovely father lost his battle against cancer.  I know Christian died happy that his beloved daughter is living her dream and I’m sure anyone who has been following the family’s struggle will join me in sending sympathy, love and blessings to Tuesday and her mum.

Having published a book about Life in 2012, I’m now in the early stages of writing one about what we call ‘Death’.  Both Will and Tuesday lost a parent to cancer at a heart-breakingly early age and if I can write something that will help others going through that experience in any way, it will be worthwhile.

A very happy and peaceful New Year to everyone out there in Blogland.

Jan (or Janon!) xxx

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 2,100 times in 2015. If it were a cable car, it would take about 35 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

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Just Beyond Your Mind

Inferno Canto 1 spirit guide

It was there again.   I hadn’t felt it for quite a while – that slight but insistent pressure against the top-back of my head. It tells me when to go with the hunch that’s niggling in my mind – the one my logical brain is telling me I should probably ignore. So I trusted the hunch.

It was a delightful day; a group of like-minded people had gathered at my home and we’d talked for hours.   One, though, was quieter. I’d not seen her for several years and was saddened to find her confused, anxious and somewhat tongue-tied. She’d travelled many miles and across several countries to be here. I asked her what her heart wanted.

Her face coloured slightly and she looked down, shy at becoming the centre of attention. Then she spoke:

“I want to reach my Guides!   I want to receive help from them – to know what to do next. I left my job because I knew it was not where I should be, but I can’t find what I should do now. I knew I should come here to Glastonbury now, but I still don’t know what it is I’m here to do.”

That was when the pressure against my head started.

“Me?” I asked it, silently.   “Is this what she’s here for?”

“Yep,” said whatever-it-was. “Get over to the computer.”

It was my turn to look slightly embarrassed now.

“I’m sorry,” I said to the others. “Do you mind? I think I need to do this now.   I’m being told to help here.”

They all nodded, somewhat bemused, and I invited the friend who had spoken to sit beside me. I clicked the machine on and loaded a word processor, sat to steady myself for a few moments – to ‘connect’ as they say – and typed:

Can we help C to reach her Guides today?

Then, as I’d done countless times before, I picked up the carnelian dowsing pendulum that always sits beside the computer, held it balanced in my left hand, between the G and H at the centre of the keyboard and waited for it to move.  A distinct diagonal swing upwards and to the right.   I allowed my hand to follow and waited to see where it would settle and circle gently: Y.  Typing that with my right hand, I returned the pendulum to the centre.  It twitched up and left this time: E.  I smiled.  There was a slight gasp behind me and as I’d expected, the next movement was over to S.  When I returned it to the centre that time, it simply circled gently where it was – the way my pendulum indicates that the word is finished.

“Tissues?” I asked, hearing the sobs and gulps beside me.   My friend nodded gratefully. I sent another friend off to find her some as I tried to explain what was happening.

Pendulum, Quartz, Chain, Alternative“I discovered this way of communicating with Spirit many years ago, when a friend who had passed over needed to communicate with me. I used to use a semi-circle of letters written on a sheet of paper, but this works just as well and it means I can keep a record of the conversation as I work. I’ve run workshops to show people how to do it. It works for a few people, not for others. I use it now to talk to my own Guides. Sometimes I’m able to reach guidance for other people – not often.   I felt today your Guide wished to use this method to communicate with you.”

 

By now my friend had composed herself and had questions galore to ask her Guide. We worked together to discover her Guide’s name.

“Where are you from?” she wanted to know next.

FROM A SPACE JUST BEYOND YOUR MIND

came the reply.

She asked how she could speak to her Guide, and was assured that she already did so. We all laughed at that. We knew her real question was about how they could have a two-way conversation, but Spirit responds to our questions in very literal ways. We refined the question and she was told she would feel the responses in her heart.

“Yes,” she said, in a very small voice, full of wonder. “Now I understand. For so long I have been listening for something speaking inside my head or to see some sign… I hadn’t trusted to feel.”

I often find this kind of channelling quite tiring, but today pressure was building up inside my head.   I was sensing the frustration both she and her Spirit Guide had been experiencing as they tried to make contact.   Now the floodgates had opened!

Many questions followed and wise, beautiful answers were given. She was told what sort of job to seek and assured that a suitable position would become available to her. She was shown how her own unique blend of skills and attributes would help her in this work.

Finally she asked, “Is my Guide a ‘he’ or a ‘she’?”

I grinned. I’d asked just that question of my own Guide when we’d first made contact, all those years ago. I knew exactly what the answer would be and could feel warmth and humour from this beautiful being spreading through me as I received the reply.

CALL ME WHICH EVER FEELS MOST COMFORTABLE TO YOU

“Your Guide doesn’t have a body,” I explained, “and so no gender. He or she will answer to either.”

She smiled and nodded, expressed her thanks, which I duly typed and all that was left to do was to print out the message for her to take home and treasure.

Banner, Header, Candle, Star, Christmas

We talked on then, all of us, far into the evening, with candlelight twinkling around the room.   We discussed our feelings and intuitions, told stories of the times we’d followed hunches and where they’d taken us.   We expressed our gratitude that such wisdom and guidance is so very close – just beyond our minds and sometimes pressing against our heads or hearts.

I’ve Got Sunshine on a Cloudy Day

logo Well that’s a lovely surprise.

Dull and cloudy here in Glasto, but the lovely and hugely talented Swetha M has nominated me for A Sunshine Blogger Award.

Cheers, Swetha!

So here to celebrate are The Temptations, circa 1965, and assorted deer, badgers, foxes, frogs and things. (I know – the relevance eludes me too.  Very sweet, though.)

Now the rules for sunshine blogger award: 

  • Thank the blogger who nominated you for the award.
  • Display the banner /sticker /logo on your blog.
  • Share 7 facts or things about yourself.
  • Nominate 5 bloggers that you admire and inform nominees by commenting on their blog.

So I’ve said ‘thank you’ and the banner is up there above the warthogs, and it now falls to me, as the proud recipient, to list 7 facts about myself.

Let’s see…  I was going to do a bucket list, but I’m actually the most ridiculously contented of people and I don’t think I could come up with that many desires, so I suppose it has to be facts.

  1. I don’t have any pets since the last of the goldfish died in October, and I have no plans to replace him (Could have been a her – not sure how you tell with fish – but its name was Merlin, so ‘him’ it was.) as I want to encourage wildlife in my pond.
  2. English: Good Hare Day!!!!!

    I love animals, but it has to be a glimpse of a red kite, hare or fallow deer on a country walk to really rock my boat.  The neighbour’s moggy relieving itself in my garden or a pug-on-a-pink-lead just doesn’t do it for me.

  3. I lose myself totally in gardening and disappear off somewhere magical – that’s the kneeling on the ground with hands deep in loam variety of gardening.  When I return to the planet, I feel pure joy for hours afterwards.
  4. My favourite place in the world is the Chalice Well Gardens.  I used to regularly travel hundreds of miles to visit them and now I live just across the road.  How lucky am I?
  5. Deutsch: Aspidistra elatior (Habitus)

    I don’t drive.  Never have.  Yet I love travelling, so do masses of bus and train journeys; less convenient perhaps, but greener, and they’re far more fun, as you get to meet such amazing and interesting people.  Last year I had a bus ride around North London chatting happily with a  pair of young Afro-Caribbean guys nursing a huge aspidistra; would love to know the back-story!

  6. I’m not afraid of death.  Absolutely not at all.  Dying could be unpleasant, of course, depending on the circumstances, but I’m with Peter Pan on this one: ‘To die would be an awfully big adventure.’  Not that I’m suicidal, I hasten to add.  I find life a huge adventure too, and am very much enjoying it.  When the time comes, though, bring it on.
  7. Just one bucket list item to finish, then.  I want to write another book, or maybe more – something that will help people feel good and important and generally as wonderful as they really are.  So a book to banish fear, basically, because that’s all that holds people back.

Right, and now for my nominees…

Yes, ridiculously difficult to select just five, and I do want these people to understand that if they don’t want to accept or do anything with the award, that’s just fine by me.  However they are people whose writing inspires and/or fascinates and brings me great pleasure, so I hope other readers will follow the links and discover the magic:

First a couple of ‘Version 2.0’ writers (You’d have to have read my book to understand that!).  Love reading their blogs and their comments on mine.  Don’t always understand everything as my mind isn’t wired that way, but enjoying learning and finding out more…

Atxero on Wording Through

Synamex on Startower

Next some wonderful, generous people who give freely of their time to channel incredibly wise Guides and answer readers’ questions.  I’ve learned so much from both sites…

Cheryl on Ask Higgins

Cynthia and Bob on Ask The Council 

and finally, a new discovery whose wizardry as a writer just blows me away…

‘Rosie’ on La Tour Abolie

Oh I never have been one to follow the rules…!  There’s a sixth blog I simply have to nominate.  Sorry if this brings WordPress crashing down around us, but I illegally nominate this wise and heart-based blog from an amazing and perceptive lady who has taught me so much:

Mariner2Mother on Life is a Journey… Not a Guided Tour

I’ll creep away quietly now… 🙂

 

 

A Fairytale Finale

English: Ballet shool Deutsch: Tanzklasse

A true story, this – and if not stranger than fiction, it at least has more or less all the features of a fairytale.

Those of you with long memories, who have been following my blog for quite a while, may remember the Tale of Tuesday.  Tuesday (her real name, for once, as I’m sure someday she’ll be famous) was a young girl I taught here in Somerset until a year or so back.  My job was to teach her maths and English.  It wasn’t always easy, as sitting at a table writing was the hardest thing in the world for her.
“I need to MOVE!” she’d say, so there would be several breaks in a lesson when she was allowed to waft around the study, arms and feet stretching and waving wildly, before settling for a bit more learning.

All she wanted to do – and I truly mean ALL – was to dance.

Her ballet teacher told her parents  how talented she was.  She advised them to try for a place at a ballet school.  So it was that, in the spring of last year, Tuesday was accepted at one of London’s most prestigious (and expensive) ballet schools.  Now she was not from some wealthy, upper-middle class family.  The cost of moving to London, paying rent there and covering her fees would have been prohibitive at the best of times but this, it turned out, was the worst of times.

No sooner had Tuesday got her place, than her father was diagnosed with cancer.  He is one of the most focused people I’ve ever met, and thinks the world of his daughter.  He’d been quite prepared to work all hours to fund her place, but his health deteriorated very fast and things became incredibly difficult.

So do you believe in magic?  Friends rallied round, a crowd-funding appeal was set up and somehow – none of us are quite sure how it happened – the rent, the fees and the cost of all the extras a young dancer needs were paid month by month.  I know that some of my blog followers were kind enough to contribute to her fund, so heartfelt thanks to them.

Those were hard and difficult days.  Her mother was worried sick each day.  Her dad was battling his illness and still trying to work when he could.  Tuesday struggled to fit in with a class of children from very different backgrounds to herself.  When I met up with them in London last Christmas things looked bleak.  None of us knew what would happen.

Bridge, Wood, Forest, Woods, Tree, TreesTime for a sprinkling of fairy dust now, though.

The ballet school discovered the desperate situation the family were in.  They also discovered that Tuesday was an outstanding dancer – one they wanted to hold on to.  They offered her a bursary, so that she could keep attending for free.  Her dad was moved to one of London’s best hospitals specialising in cancer, so that he had access to pioneering treatment and expert care.  He’s still with us.  Tuesday began to earn the respect of her classmates and to fit in far better.  By the summer, things were looking up.

Every Christmas, the school puts on a performance of The Nutcracker at a small London theatre.  When I discovered that Tuesday had been chosen to dance Clara – the leading role, I knew I had to go and watch.

As in all fairy tales, though, there are twists and turns in the plot right up to the end.  The theatre was closed at very short notice and it seemed the show would have to be cancelled.  I did tell you it was a prestigious school, didn’t I?  There were friends in high places and somehow or other they were given the run of one of the most famous theatres in London’s West End for a day.

Statue of Anna Pavlova on the dome of the Vict...

Thus it was that I found myself sitting in the royal circle, watching the most magical production, while the little girl who had twirled and glided around my study just a year or so before was giving an immaculate performance and capturing the hearts of everyone in the audience.

The ballet school had thoughtfully sent a car to pick her father up, so that he would be able to watch.  During the interval Darcey Bussell – one of the UK’s most celebrated ballerinas – introduced herself to him and told him how brilliant Tuesday’s performance was.

I just could not have been happier and prouder as I watched Tuesday take her curtain call and accept a bouquet of flowers with poise and grace that belied her tender age.

On the tube going home, I overheard a couple discussing the show.
“That little girl who danced the lead,” said the man, “What a future she has ahead of her!”
“She was splendid,” agreed his partner.

She was.

 

 

 

 

The Proof is Out There

IMG_20151205_070812A very quick post script to my previous post.

The book arrived and was printed just the way I’d hoped it would be.  I’m feeling so grateful that the whole project has worked out exactly as I hoped it would.  Back to expecting and receiving miracles.

Life really is magical when we allow it to be.

The Words of William: Volume One is now available on at least some Amazon sites.

So for anyone who enjoys short but deep paperbacks filled with musings on metaphysics and psychic phenomena, written from within the wonderful world of autistic spectrum perception, it is available:

here in the United Kingdom

and here in the United States.

(You can click on the links above to go straight to the book’s sales pages on Amazon.)

 

Also still available in Kindle format.

 

Thinner than Blood 2: Waiting for Proof

That’s what I’m doing – right now.

I’m sitting in my little cottage in sleepy Somerset, waiting for the proof to arrive.

The proof I speak of is a slim, modest paperback proof-copy of William’s words.  It’s travelling from the United States and should – the publishers assure me – be here today.

I’m excited – quite stupidly so.  I know The Words almost by heart now, having formatted and reformatted them so many times.  They are words I collected and saved over nearly twenty years – childhood scribblings and conversations, strange visions and apparent prophecies delivered by a puzzled adolescent boy, emailed articles and comments sent by a young man cut off from most other contact by the anxiety that now surrounds his life.

Formatting

Formatting

As explained in a previous post, I had the idea of collating many of his words and presenting them to him as a birthday present.  Then I asked if he’d like them turned into an e-book and made available to others.  He wasn’t sure.  He needed to think that through.  Did the most private person you can imagine want other eyes poring over his thoughts and ideas?  After what felt to me like an eternity, he decided.  Yes.

Thus the Kindle edition of The Words of William was born.  To begin with, he was cautious about the whole enterprise.  Within a few days, though, my texts telling him another copy or two had sold received an instant response:

“Where?  Which country?”

He became fascinated by the thought that people were buying and borrowing his little book around the world.  He started to keep a tally.
“So that’s 1 in Spain, 4 in the UK, 6 in the US, 1 in Canada..?” he would text.  “Have I got all those right?”  and eventually, “I’m certainly happy with it and thank you for my birthday present.”

Every kind comment and wish from readers of this blog, the five star review on Amazon’s Spanish site, the messages from friends who had enjoyed it were duly passed on to him, and I could feel his confidence, self-esteem and trust in others growing by the day.

Result!

Christmas present wrapped with a gold bow and ...

Now how on Earth was I going to match that success with a Christmas gift?

Then it came to me.  “Would you like your book turned into a paperback for your Christmas present?” I asked.  “Several people have said they’d rather buy it like that than as an e-book.”
The reply was instant: “Yes please.”

Sorted.  I emailed a friend in the States who had recently published a book with Amazon’s Create Space service.  She came back with a host of useful hints and tips.

I can’t pretend it was easy.  The formatting and cover had to be totally redone and there were contentious bits like the ‘About the Author’ page.  William strongly disliked my first attempt at that, but then amazed me by re-drafting much of it himself.

So now, I sit and wait.  Within the next few hours, the proof will arrive – proof that The Words of William are out there in print, and I simply couldn’t be more proud 🙂

 

 

Hopefully, within the next week or so, the paperback edition of The Words of William – Volume One will be available here and on Amazon in the US, UK and Europe.