Being Grommit

Image result for wallace and gromit imagesI hesitate to write this, because there are so many people out there much better qualified to talk about it.  Still, it’s come into my head and it’s lodged there like an ear worm and won’t go away until I write it, So I suppose I’d better write…

There’s a huge amount of non-sense spoken about sensitivity and highly sensitive people, so perhaps I can add a modicum of sense, or maybe just more nonsense.

I wouldn’t generally count myself among these people (which is why I don’t feel particularly qualified to write about them) but I seem to have some kind of magnetic attraction to them.  They keep showing up in my life.  Once they are there, they tend to stick around.  Whenever that happens with people in our lives, it means we have something to teach or learn from each other – probably both.

So let me give you a very personal, no-holds-barred snapshot of how it feels to be a neuro-typical individual, living and working amongst highly-sensitive people.

They’d like to fit in with the rest of us.  They really would.  It would make their lives so much easier and they know this.  Some of them elect to go down the route of medication aimed at suppressing their sensitivity, dulling their responses and turning them into rather sad but apparently average people.  Many, many more prefer to self-medicate, using recreational drugs and/or a mixture of caffeine and alcohol to render their daily lives (or at least parts of them) more manageable.  Both of these seem to me a tragic waste – partly because of the unpleasant side-effects and partly because all these substances mask the true essence of who they really are.  Nevertheless, I understand the reasons behind the choices.  For those of us living and interacting with these people, we’re faced with a double problem of trying to understand their innate differences from our way of being and to deal with the challenges faced when dealing with anyone who is drugged up.

I frequently feel hurt, offended, rejected and dismissed by those I care about and love who live within this spectrum of being.  As a ‘typical’ person I crave affection – and some occasional expression of this, attention – such as responses to messages or to be looked at once in a while, reassurance that I’m getting things right, and trust.  I’ve discovered, slowly and painfully, that I will only get any of these by explaining my needs very carefully, providing detailed instructions on how I would like the person to react and then being satisfied with what they are able to provide, even if it does feel more like a rehearsed trick than a genuine, spontaneous action on their part.

Does that sound terribly harsh?

If we look at it from their perspective, they do NOT lack emotions and feelings.  They have them in such abundance that their fragile human bodies are just about incapable of containing them.  They probably dealt with this as newborns by screaming endlessly, as children by throwing tantrums or head-banging, as adolescents by almost total withdrawal from society and family and immersion in music, video games or self-harm.  During that long, painful process, they have learned to suppress almost all emotion, except fear and anxiety, which just won’t go away.  They care and want to please as much as anyone, but it’s deeply scary for them, and any tiny steps they can take should be welcomed with deep gratitude by those of us who can’t even imagine what it is costing them.

They know and feel and see things we don’t.  They’ve learned that in our society, people who know more than others are usually considered clever, so they can easily become so supercilious and self-opinionated that I want to punch them.  They’re frustrated when we don’t get what seems ludicrously obvious to them.  I find myself thinking, ‘Good grief, here you are, treating me like a five year old, when you can’t even walk into a shop and buy a pack of underwear.’

So why is it like this?

In my opinion, all of us are – first and foremost – pure consciousness.  You can call it soul or spirit if that works for you.  We have all chosen to bring a portion of this pure, rarefied consciousness into physical bodies – to be born as humans.  It involves a fair bit of give and take to do that.  If you think of the consciousness as Light, there is only so much we can squeeze into a human body.  Most of us have been happy with that trade-off as it means we can experience physical existence and use this unique way of (human) being to grow in a way that can’t be achieved otherwise.  Image result for wallace and gromit images

Now think of the way consciousness works.  There is an innate wish to push the boundaries – to go farther, faster, higher than anyone else has done.  Consequently, ever-growing numbers of conscious beings are trying to squeeze more and more Light into the frail, delicate human bodies they are being born into.

It means the fit is not great.  They can’t bed down into their bodies so easily and some of the Light isn’t properly held in.  I keep getting this mental image of Wallace frantically screaming, “Grommit – these are the Wrong Trousers!” in the wonderful Aardman animated film!

Image result for wallace and gromit imagesAnd I often feel like poor old Grommit, frantically trying to avert disasters and melt-downs, and help my enLightened friends, students, relatives and acquaintances to fit into the crazy trousers-of-life they’ve entered, while assisting them to understand that yes, the world DOES need the Light they’ve brought with them and that their brilliance is an absolute gift to all of us.

So stay with us, all you wonderful Wallaces.  Try your best to function in those trousers.  We Grommits will keep trying to help you in every way we can – because that’s why WE incarnated.

 

 

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Expanding Consciousness

List of images in Gray's Anatomy: IX. Neurology

“I am everywhere.”

That’s how the film ‘Lucy’ ends.  (Thanks to Atxero for pointing me in its direction.)  It’s a Matrixy kind of a thing – Scarlett Johansson gratuitously destroying anyone who gets in her way, turning ‘life’ to a video game scenario as she develops new and unimaginable neural connections and expands her consciousness until all of her brain is being used, rather than the 10% or so most of us have been settling for.

I was woken up to this expanded consciousness idea some years ago – by Will, the guy I’m currently working with on remote viewing .  He was a little kid then.  He made it impossible for me not to notice that he was seeing things I couldn’t see,  sensing things I couldn’t sense and performing psychic tricks and feats that left me scrabbling to catch up and understand.

English: corpus callosum. Images are from Anat...

English: corpus callosum.  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There are babies, children, teenagers and young people – even a few older ones – who came into life this time around with expanded consciousness.  In my book I called them the Version 2.0 players in this game of Life.  They are the ones who haven’t fully forgotten what is actually going on here – who they really are.  They’re struggling – many of them – to get along with the everyday details of life: social interaction, school, shopping, going to work… but that’s because they are holding an awesome amount of Light or Memory or Spirit or whatever you’d like to call it, within their consciousness.

One day, some meddling but oddly broad-minded scientist will take a look inside the heads of some of these people and discover something unexpected – extra DNA strand activation?  Something rather interesting around the pineal gland?  Neural pathways way beyond what the textbooks show?  A distorted and expanded corpus callosum?  I have no idea what, but something will appear.  I strongly suspect all of the above, as well as a transition from carbon based to crystal based life, but I’m no scientist, just an interested observer. They’ll probably label it a syndrome or dysfunction anyhow, because scientists tend to like norms and neat bell curves.

The rest of us – those who maybe didn’t come into Life that way, but have been jump-started by our special young people – are catching up.  They are waking us up to a new way of being and experiencing – and it’s wonderful.

“I know I’m obviously biased,” my daughter told me, rather apologetically, the other day, “but there are times when he seems to shine somehow…”
She was talking about her 3 year old son.  I’m biased too, but she’s right.  He does.  I was with the two of them at the weekend.  He was raking a flowerbed for his seeds in the garden.

“This is a good day, Mummy,” he said, quietly and thoughtfully.
She looked at him and smiled, slightly bemused.  “You say that every day,” she pointed out.
He looked into her eyes then and said, very pointedly, “But it IS good.”

I checked with her later,  He really does say it every day?  “Yes,” she insisted, “and we won’t be doing anything special – just walking along the street or eating lunch or something.  Then he’ll tell me it’s a good day.”

What a beautiful lesson that tiny little kid is giving his mother.  She believes she’s just about coping – managing him and his three month old sister and the home; she’s rushed off her feet and always feeling someone is losing out.  But the child sees past that.  He sees the goodness of every day and gives it back to her.

IMG_20150510_085131The next day it was my turn.  We were walking through an orchard.  I was aware that it was a pretty place – just aware.  My focus was elsewhere.  Then he stopped and turned to me.

“This is a Good Day, Grandma,” he said, with the gentlest emphasis on those words.

Suddenly I was able to feel it the way he was experiencing it – the family clustered around us, the crunching gravel under our feet, the azure sky with scudding grey clouds, the apple blossom and buzzing of the bees, the birdsong everywhere,  the utter beauty of nature in an English springtime – and I felt all the deep joy that had bubbled up inside him spilling into me from his deep brown eyes.

I felt, as I always have with Will or the many other Version 2.0s I’ve known, so honoured to be given a glimpse into his consciousness.

He’s one of the special ones.

Not the Remotest

IMG_20150308_133229Neither of us, if you’ll pardon the pun, has the remotest idea how it works.

But it does.

Will has explained eloquently how the process of remote viewing is experienced from the viewer’s perspective:

When I say ‘see’ it’s more of a visualising of the feelings that I get, which I suspect is highly influenced by my logical mind trying to form a likely interpretation of the feelings, than say a vision or anything that compares with how I ordinarily see using my eyes.

It’s Sunday afternoon and I’m standing in a garden centre, sheltering from a heavy spring shower in one of the poly-tunnels.  Outside are flowerbeds, benches covered in pot plants and windbreaks supporting tubs of trees.  I text Will to tell him I’m ready to begin.  He texts back, “Start now” and I spend the next ten minutes looking carefully at everything around me, drinking in the sights, sounds, scents and textures of the place.

We’ve moved on from viewing a crystal held in my hand to viewing locations.  He has no clue as to where I am.  He’s sitting in a room across the country and simply knows that I have chosen a venue and will remain there for ten minutes.  He focuses on me and tries – with some sense way beyond the physical – to pick up impressions of the place I’m in.

Time’s up.  I take photos.  He, meanwhile, is drawing and annotating a sketch of what he ‘saw’.  I receive a message:

Hope you can make this picture out and my handwriting.  Also think water might be involved somewhere.

IMG_20150308_133214 (1)I look skywards and grin.  Plenty of wet stuff.  Then I look at his drawing.  He’s viewed it from several yards away from where I was standing.  The flowers are there.  He’s drawn one of the benches – presumably the one covered in concrete planting pots – and one of the tree support windbreaks, which he’s labelled ‘Structure, free-standing’.  The three ‘hills’ he’s drawn in the background are in the right position for the three poly tunnels.  They have green coverings – very hill-like.

IMG_20150308_133258“It’s good,” I tell him, and send some of the photos I’ve taken.

Every weekend there are new wonders – he drew a medieval barn I passed on the way to a site.  I’d paused long enough to consider using it, but discounted it as it was closed to the public and would be far better on a day when I could stand inside.  How, then, did he draw an interior view of it, with the roof trusses that couldn’t be seen from the outside?

Distant viewing, x-ray viewing and – as has now become apparent –  future viewing.

As I explained in last week’s post, he’d managed to pick up details of two of my crystals before I had focussed on them.  He pointed out, though, that he knew in those cases what he was trying to home in on.  With a location viewing, he had no idea where to hunt.  All he knew was that he was searching for wherever I would be on the Sunday at a set time.

One Saturday he did just that.  He made some notes of what he saw and waited for the Sunday session.  My son was visiting me.  It was he who suggested the location – and not until Sunday morning.

The day before it had even been chosen, then, Will had correctly identified the tower of a church and claimed there was something round on the ground nearby.  On the Sunday he did a second viewing and was confused when he got a different scene.  The solution was easy.  The church tower was directly behind me.  The tree and grass he saw on the Sunday were in front.  Still I was puzzled by the round object.  It had to be there somewhere.  Finally it was my son who solved that one.

IMG_20150329_191207“Will must have seen the labyrinth laid out in the church grounds,” he said.

I headed back to take a photo and sent it to Will.  It was a match.

I won’t pretend that every location viewing we’ve done has been perfect.  Sometimes he finds features I can’t identify.  Often he misses what I would imagine to be the main or obvious aspects of a site.  Always, though, there are matches and links – enough to assure us that some connection is being formed; some information is transferring between us.

On our latest viewing, for example, there seemed to be fewer matches than usual.  I’d chosen an ancient chapel and row of almshouses set in beautifully tended gardens.  He found one or two small details but nothing that positively identified the place.  As I thought we’d finished, a final text came through.

I tried to do an advance viewing of this yesterday.  Here’s what I came up with.  Does any of this mean anything to you?

He’d attached a sheet with a few jottings.  In large print were the words:

Light?

Fire?

English: Candle Flames

How could he possibly have sensed, on the day before it happened, that when I entered the chapel I’d have a sudden impulse to light a candle for my mother (who passed over exactly two years ago) and place it in the bowl in front of the altar?  It was on the candle that my focus was centred as I sat alone in the chapel – not on the structure of the building.

I was about to say, ‘small wonder that this is what he picked up on’. But it isn’t a small wonder, is it?  It’s a huge wonder.

How does it all work?  Is this Einstein’s ‘spooky action at a distance’?  It certainly has a spooky element to it, but I’d love to understand more.

If you have any insights into how or why this happens, please comment.  We’d love to hear your thoughts.

In Praise of the New Educators

"Teacher Appreciation" featured phot...

Over the year – exactly now – that I’ve been blogging, I’ve written several posts about the New Energy (or Version 2.0, as they are called in LIFE: A Player’s Guide) children and young people now populating our planet in ever-increasing numbers.  I’ve decided it’s time to celebrate the adults who are finding new ways of working with them, since recognising that the old teacher/pupil model needs a radical rethink.

At the weekend, I was sent an email by my friend  Astrid Witt, who is a visionary teacher in a secondary school in Germany.  She also – somehow – finds time to host free, cutting-edge interviews (in perfect English!) for educators and parents on her site What The Experts Know.  I’ve listened to many amazing and inspiring world class speakers there, including Astrid herself.

With her permission, I’m reproducing a story she told in her email:

Yesterday I was teaching a maths class to ninth graders introducing a new concept and after rephrasing my first explanation a second time it became somewhat  clear that the majority of the class didn’t get it. The noise level went up and I clearly felt that it was not only their frustration level rising but I too was getting exasperated with them for not getting it. Stress was building up…on both sides!

What happened then was the result of a level of cooperation and  mutual trust I had dedicated myself to build with that class for the past 15 months… A boy raised his hand and asked me to step down from the blackboard and pass on the chalk to a student in the class who claimed to have understood me.

Now, before I started changing my paradigm of what education should accomplish, this would have ruffled my feathers big time. After all, the traditional part of my teacher training had taught me to be the authority that knew it all and knew it better and that demonstrating this authority was vital to keeping order in the class. Instead I simply felt grateful that I could pass on the baton and share the responsibility.

The student, lets call him John, grinned with delight from ear to ear, the class immediately hushed to silence. Within another 5 minutes he explained the concept from a much more “primitive” perspective … and was rewarded by many “Oh’s” and “Ah’s” from the rest of the class. Suddenly they understood … They felt happy, and as a result I felt happy .. much happier than if I had insisted on being the authority not to be questioned… and them not understanding what I had explained “so clearly” 🙂

As Astrid went on to point out, it takes a massive amount of courage and humility for educators – be they parents or teachers – to step away from being the powerful authority figure and to accept that there are other ways of working with their students.

Online Educa Berlin 2007 - Opening Plenary, No...

I was deeply inspired by her message, but by another of those synchronicities (yes, they’re still coming thick and fast!) another friend sent me this Ted Talk, the very same day.  Even if you don’t have time to listen to the whole thing, It’s certainly worth hearing Sugata Mitra‘s stunning explanation of the traditional education system at the beginning of the talk.  Definitely food for thought…

I wouldn’t go as far as suggesting we should hand education over to computers.  There is a crucial role for adults in guiding and educating even the most evolved and conscious ‘Version 2.0’ children.  However I truly believe it is changing from the old ‘top down’ model towards a partnership in which everyone has a stake – something to teach and something to learn.

I’ve yet to find a suitable title for my role in working with the children at GLOW (Glastonbury Learning OtherWise – the educational resource for home educated young people I co-run).  Facilitator?  Mentor?  Catalyst?  We certainly don’t see ourselves as teachers.  GLOW’s ethos (and name) comes from Plutarch‘s declaration that:

“The mind is not a vessel to be filled; it is a fire to be kindled.”

We simply light the imagination of our awesome young people and sit back to enjoy the glow!

I feel incredibly lucky to have had the opportunity to escape the education system and move into other ways of working with the young.  However I have the utmost respect and admiration for those who work to change and expand the system from within.  For that reason, I’ll finish with another reflection from Astrid Witt:

Instead of creating those moments of tense silence and subdued emotions (or stubborn defiance in children) that happen when someone (mis-)uses their power, you could be gifted with a deeper mutual understanding and discover a new level of communication that helps both sides! And it has a wonderful side effect of truly empowering those who need to learn to take responsibility for themselves.

Big Questions – Huge Answers

PhotonQ-Young solar System

“So,” I grinned, “I’m going to give you ten minutes to each come up with your own answers to these questions:  Firstly, was the creation of the universe a random or intentional event?  Secondly, if it was intentional, who or what do you think intended it?”

My audience was a small group of home-educated children, aged between 10 and 14.

We’ve been running our weekly philosophy club for a while now – long enough for them to understand that nothing they say will be ruled out or laughed down; long enough for me to have the highest expectations and to know that I’ll receive some stunning answers to questions that have taxed the greatest minds throughout history.  We’d discussed creation myths, the views of major religions and the big bang theory.  Now it was their turn.

Some chose to jot down thoughts on scraps of paper, some drew pictures or diagrams, one spent his time scribbling ideas and ripping them up at great speed and the rest sat thinking silently.

NO CHAOS“Right,” I said, when seven minutes had passed and all seemed ready.  “Anyone need more time?”

They didn’t.

What follows is just a flavour of the richness and depth of the answers and ideas that flowed around the room.

 

I think it was random.  Somehow two things came together and that started it…

But nothing’s random.  There’s always a cause.  Even things that seem completely random happen because of something…

Maybe there wasn’t a start.  Maybe it’s always been happening.  Maybe matter just keeps on moving together until the pressure’s too great, then it explodes apart again…

…or maybe none of it’s real anyway – all this could be just a dream or an illusion…

We can never know for sure – unless we could time-travel back to see…

Perhaps one day we’ll be able to do that…

I don’t know how it started, but I believe we evolved – like people say – came out of the sea.  But we’re still evolving…

…I used to know when I was little, but now I’m not so sure.  You hear different things.  It’s so confusing…

Probably something made our universe – something from another world or place or time…

It could have been like a timelord or something…

Perhaps we’re an experiment…

 

Thinking

Thinking (Photo credit: Moyan_Brenn)

 

No one was certain.  Indeed, most were rather apologetic that they couldn’t give a definitive answer.

When all was done, though, and I’d assured them that the thinking and questing for answers was what really mattered, and that their ideas mirrored those of the world’s wisest philosophers, they smiled and nodded – and suddenly broke into spontaneous mutual applause.

How lucky I am to have the opportunity to listen to children and share their thoughts.  All they need is space to think and a place to talk.

Incredible Hulks

Everything has its shadow side. That much is obvious. After all, we are participating in a game based around polarities.

It helps to think of it like a set of balance scales. Some of our experiences just wobble slightly either side of centre, but the huge ones have an equal and opposite reaction.

Today I’m thinking again about those special young people I talk about so much – the ones who are labelled indigo and crystal on one side of the scales; mentally ill and disordered on the other. I call them the Version 2.0 kids. You’d need to read Life: A Player’s Guide to understand why.

These people are NEVER in balance. They swing from one polarity to the other. Those of us privileged and challenged to be close to them witness the astounding wisdom, insight and light they are bringing to the world. We also witness the fury, frustration and terrifying outbursts of aggression and violence. They are two sides of the same coin.

At the time of writing, the world has just witnessed a particularly extreme example of the latter. Most of us may try, and fail, to comprehend what was going through the mind of young Adam, as he gunned down little children and their teachers. I’d hazard a guess that most of our Version 2.0 young people can understand.

At the weekend I ‘happened’ (no such thing as coincidence) to meet two people who had young adult sons on the autistic spectrum. Both described how their boys spend most of their lives holed up indoors, needing support and supervision and prey to massive swings from being brilliant, eloquent and enlightening to being abusive, angry and out of control. There are countless other families sharing this experience in silent desperation and praying that their kid doesn’t become the next mass killer.

As I’ve explained in other posts, these young people are stress-testing LIFE. They (and, of course, those of us who are close to them) are seeing how life plays out if there are no limits to the levels of enlightenment and ‘endarkenment’ that can be reached. Each of them is an incredible hulk, shutting themselves away for our protection until they can find a way to move beyond polarity and into unity.

When is a prank call a wake-up call?

The 14-year-old boy was trying to put his vision of December 2012 into words for me. He was clearly shaken by what he was seeing and as confused as anyone looking into the future might expect to be. He didn’t make a habit of this, but he was one of those special, Version 2.0 kids and sometimes he just ‘saw’ things. I was used to him picking up a book I’d been reading, for example, and without glancing beyond the cover, summarising the information it contained. This was a bit different, though.

“How can you possibly see the future?” I was asking. “Surely it’s only potential as yet.”
“Oh yes,” he agreed, readily. “There are infinite possibilities… It’s just that they all seem to lead to this one point.”

So for the last seven years (the conversation happened in 2005) I’ve been watching with interest as one after another of his predictions has come true.

“It will all start with finance,” was his opening line. He explained as best he could that the financial world would go through a drastic and sudden change. He saw a deep polarity between ‘good’ and ‘bad’ developing and said it would have an effect on everyone. We would all have to re-think our relationship with the financial world.

In 2008 I texted him. “U predicted this.”
“Yep,” he replied.

The financial crisis, which still rumbles on, was the first of these events – the ones that take accepted aspects of our daily life and shake them to the core, until we wake up to what’s going on and decide to make some drastic changes.

Here in the UK, we’ve followed up with the MP’s expenses issue, the media intrusion debate and the maelstrom unleashed over allegations about a deceased DJ’s sexual behaviour. Other countries have had their own political, financial and social awakenings – the so-called Arab Spring being the most wide-ranging and important. Quite suddenly, shabby, unpleasant but long-tolerated practices cease to be acceptable. Dirty linen is hauled up for public inspection and washed very thoroughly.

The changes are happening at a personal level, too.
“It will be a bit like Noah’s Ark,” the boy told me. “Not the same as that, but something like it.”

Watching pictures of people’s homes, cars and livelihoods being washed away by the extreme floods this year has witnessed in many parts of the world, I can see what he meant.

The Chinese glyph for ‘crisis’ is, I learned recently, a mixture of two others – ‘disaster’ and ‘opportunity’.

The loss of life, given the huge amount of devastation, has been relatively small, but the changes at neighbourhood, family and individual levels have been massive.

Based on what my prophetic young friend told me, I’d suggest that this World Shift – the much-heralded 2012 End of Age – is not about mass destruction so much as mass transformation.

What if you’d always indulged in some rather dodgy work practices because everyone around you did, and then found yourself at the heart of a massive scandal? A disaster for you, but an opportunity to become more authentic in future. What if you’d dreamed of giving up your job and ‘following your bliss’ but been held back by knowing you had to keep up the payments on the car and the house? Suddenly they’re both washed away in a flood. Where does that leave you?
With both a disaster and an opportunity.

So, then, what if making prank calls to innocent victims had been a seedy but accepted part of your professional life? No one could doubt, after watching the interview, the depth of horror, remorse and pain those people in Australia are experiencing, or the deep changes the recent tragic event will make to their lives. Perhaps, though, they – and others engaged in similar forms of ‘entertainment’ – are being given an opportunity to make some core changes.

Our individual and collective wake-up calls to live a more honest, authentic and transparent life, free of subterfuge, sleaze and unkindness began with a tap on the shoulder. If we ignored that, the taps became more insistent… and if we reach the end of this Great Age without heeding that call, surely we can expect the kind of sledgehammer blow we are seeing around us.